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Logic and conventional wisdom may have you believe that Democratic and Republican Presidential candidates should spend most of their time and energy focusing on voters who fall near the middle of the political spectrum… because Republicans can rely on support of conservatives and Democrats can rely on support of liberals.

Not this year.

One of the biggest uncertainties surrounding Trump’s candidacy is what will happen if and when he makes it to the general election. Will Republicans outside of his notoriously loyal followers support him? Will nonpartisans flock to him in the way that he claims? Spoiler: the numbers aren’t promising (for him at least).

The tension between Donald Trump and Megyn Kelly has been one of the more entertaining aspects of the saga that is the 2016 Republican primary. It started with Megyn’s question about his treatment of women, continued as Trump struck out with some sexist comments, and peaked when Trump refused to attend the debate moderated by Kelly. All in all very entertaining in terms of political campaign drama.

From 3.22.16 – 3.24.16 an IVR based poll was conducted in Wisconsin of likely Republican presidential primary voters. The poll was has an N = 6,182(!), weighted, stratified listed sample at the statewide level and each individual congressional district.  Yes, each congressional district.  Delegate math junkies here is your fix. 

From 3.22.16 – 3.24.16 an IVR based poll was conducted in New York of likely Republican presidential primary voters.  The poll was has an N = 14,232(!), weighted, stratified listed sample at the statewide level and each individual congressional district.  Yes, each congressional district.  Delegate math junkies here is your fix.